Tiller-orama #3

Yup, we’re back and the -orama goes on… slowly.

DSC01145DSC01146Boring to landlubbers, this past weekend was time for a dry fit since the major components are at hand. Which means it was time to start hacking away on my cockpit combing. First centering and marking. No looking back… the hack begins. First the iroko. OUCH!

DSC01147Then the fiberglass hole-ing

DSC01148

And after some filing, the new shaft slides in… sexy! (naughty by nature)

DSC01150And here’s what it sort of is  gonna look when it’s finally installed.

Looking aft

DSC01154The new shaft is going to be raised about 10cm to keep the bars horizontal. Here’s what   the rudder stock looks like looking forward and aft respectively.

DSC01152DSC01155Pretty much what has to be done now is square (diamond) off the top of the new shaft, have it raised and secured to the lazarette floor, and acquire the tiller to shaft whatchamacallit. (I still haven’t figured out where the hydraulics bypass valve is going to live.)

Any questions????

(Spare me, please)

DSC01144DSC01141And for anyone else who wants to know anything else…. Kostas got the swing keel for his wooden boat project and I got the correct part (I think) for my tranny.

This coming weekend, I’m working till late Saturday. Sunday is looking windy, cold and crappy. I kinda doubt the tranny will be ready, nor the tillers’ loose ends….. perfect weather to start sanding the old antifoul paint off the hull, which I despise religiously (not the sanding, the pains in my shoulder!).

Stay tuned

Capt Pete

ps….It’s a balmy 22degC today, but Sunday is forecast  for something stupid, like 5C. Still though… Spring is in the air!

pss….. I remember when I moved back to Greece almost 25 years ago, It used to drive me nuts how long it took thing to get done comparatively. It still does!!!!

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About Sailing Zoot Allures

A demoralized mechanical engineer/ bass player/ sound engineer/editor seeks Freedom
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8 Responses to Tiller-orama #3

  1. fOGHORN says:

    OK,first of all you need to change your headline to tiller drama not orama,secondly(regarding your pss)as if you needed an excuse to go nuts,and finally ,i am,i say boy,i am an air/landlubber.I rest my case,good luck with your modifications

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  2. sryoder says:

    The hydraulics bypass valve? Aren’t you eliminating all the hydraulics when you go to tiller steering?

    BTW, it’s been a cool 20ºC (for you Euro-types) here on the northern Sea of Cortez lately.

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    • Cool 20C, eh. We got slammed this winter for Athenian standards. 20C was balmy!
      I’m maintaining the hydraulic setup for the doghouse steering and autopilot. Bypass open=tiller… bypass closed=doghouse/no tiller. It’s going to be a heavy tiller, but I got a heavy boat. I don’t plan on going back and forth much. I should get a tiller pilot (?$?) but I’ll experiment with sheet to tiller this year. My hydraulic pilot is an amp guzzler! I was wondering which tiller pilot you’ve got (I’ll go digging in your blog)

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      • sryoder says:

        My tiller pilot is a Simrad TP-32. Siempre Sabado was a 13,500 lb. boat as she came from the factory but must weigh at least a couple thousand pounds more by now. Tiller pilot works great except when getting short choppy seas on the nose or just off the nose. Then it can’t react fast enough. Waves throw her off-course, tiller pilot tries to bring her back, overshoots the target, waves throw her off the other way, compounding the problem. Then it’s either hand-steering or, if the wind is right, the windvane which seems to handle the short choppies much better. A setup where the tiller pilot is the input signal to the windvane (instead of wind) would, or at least should, work better than a straight tiller pilot to tiller connection and suck up WAY fewer amps. Just never have gotten around to making the mods to do that although the Cape Horn vane does come with an attachment for doing that very thing.

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      • Thanks Steve. Yeah, the TP-32 looks like the beefiest one out there but my approx. 19000lb are still over the spec. Plus it;s gonna be a heavy tiller if I dont disconnect the hydraulic ram from the rudder post. Hmmm… I’ll probably stick with my hydraulic AP switching to the doghouse helm for this year and experiment with sheet to tiller when I bypass the hydraulics. I’ve got an old windvane which is basically a spare rudder but I’ve taken it off the boat for the time being due to it being a monster and everyone giving me stick for ever considering using it around here. (If you got the bandwidth, you can see it on a video on my first blog post). Thanks

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  3. horaciomateus says:

    Yeah, I have a question.
    Being pictorially challenged and not an engineer like you, I got all hung up on how that steel-bar-square contraption connecting the rudder post to the tiller post is going to swing. I gather that it’s not a rigid square…I mean, when you pull the tiller to one side the post will rotate and the forward-aft bars will not be imprisoned by the bolts holding the square together at the corners, thereby allowing the square to deform.
    Man, you better not explain it. Wait until it’s working and then post a picture.
    Wait!!! OK, I just imagined using 2 cables instead of the bars and it makes perfect sense now. Hey, it took a while for Adam to figure out what Eve’s accessories were for.

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    • And we all know what happened to Adam when he figured that out. And now we’re paying the price, dagnamit!
      So yeah, I have to apologize for all of this being ambiguous. I’ll have to dedicate a post to clear things up. But here’s a link for food http://www.old-engine.com/belts2.htm
      The bolts will be loose with locking bolts. Turning the tiller will form a parallelogram with the bars. I had envisioned using chain and sprockets or cables but the bars approach seems more robust, maintenance free…. and easier/cheaper. So Eve can eat her heart out!

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